Chat with us, powered by LiveChat These are the details for Unit 9. I chose the narrative source https://this.org/2020/06/17/im-not-a- - Wridemy

These are the details for Unit 9. I chose the narrative source https://this.org/2020/06/17/im-not-a-

 

These are the details for Unit 9.

Welcome to Unit 9!

In this unit, we write the first full draft of the research essay.

We’ll accomplish this work by going through the following steps:

  • Revisit the purpose of the assignment and review prewriting materials.
  • Draft a provisional thesis.
  • Outline the essay.
  • Draft the essay.   

What Will You Be Learning in Unit 9?

Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to 

·  write a provisional thesis;

·  outline a research essay; 

  • draft a research essay; and
  • craft an introduction and conclusion. 

Unit 9 Tasks

To complete this unit, you will complete several tasks. These tasks will be given during the week as you read through each section.

They are

  1. Draft a provisional thesis 
  2. Create Your Outline
  3. Create Your Complete Draft

Resources

I'm A Dad-To-Be With A Disability. Here's Why I'm Learning To Carry A Baby Months In Advance. 

(Source: Aaron Broverman, Special To Huff Post https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/dad-with-disability-baby-carrying_ca_5e4ff985c5b6a4525dba7080?utm_hp_ref=ca-perspectives )

Go to the eReserves and read the following:

  • Centennial College: APA Style Library Guide
  • Research Hub: How to Cite: Build Citations
  • Research Hub: How to Cite: Citation Styles 
  • Research Hub: How to Cite: Citation Tools
  • Research Hub: How to Cite: Why Cite?

How Do I Organize My Time in Unit 9?

You will complete Unit 9 in Week 9 of the semester. It is important to organize your time throughout the week to ensure that you have the time to read through the online content and complete the learning activities. 

Here are some suggestions on how to organize your time: 

  • Read all the sections by Thursday. 
  • Outline the essay on Thursday.
  • Draft the essay on Friday. 
  • Edit and submit the outline and draft by midnight on Monday.  

Centennial College. (n.d.). Unit 9: Unit 9 Overview. In COMM170. Winter 2020 [Online course]. https://e.centennialcollege.ca/d2l/le/content/538911/viewContent/5658788/View

(Task: Draft the Thesis)

In this unit, you will continue the work you began in Unit 6, leading up to the finished Research-Driven Critique Essay.

You will download, complete and submit a new assignment template—the Research-Driven Critique Essay Draft—Remember, this is still  the same project as before with the same source you chose in Unit 6.

The Provisional Thesis 

Before outlining and drafting the essay, write your thesis. You may need to revise it later, but it helps to have a thesis when writing your body paragraphs.

The thesis is a clear statement of your evaluation of the main source. It should be expressed in one sentence. It summarizes everything you say in the response section of your essay.

Video 8.2: Thesis Statement

(Source: OWLPurdue. 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKXkemYldmw&feature=emb_logo)

Sample Thesis Statements

If the Main Source is a Narrative: 

Nath’s narrative is relevant and significant today because it shows the complexities of how language and identity are connected, especially when the first language of older generations is different from the individual.

If the Main Source is an Argument:

Mercer’s video argues against the common belief that young Canadians are not as smart or hardworking as older generations, but his evidence is only anecdotal, which undercuts the strength of his message.

Relation of the Thesis to the Response Section

The thesis emerges from the response. It is a one-sentence summary of your evaluation of your main source that you explain in the response section of your essay.

To come up with your thesis, ask yourself what your critical response is to your main source, based on the work you've done so far and your research. 

Why the Thesis is Provisional

This first version of the thesis is “provisional,” meaning temporary and subject to change. As you draft and revise your essay, your argument may change because you will be closely working with your sources and developing your response.

It’s important to remain open to new ideas and changes all the way up to the final submission of the project.

However, it's a good idea to get it clear in your head what you're planning to argue, so that you can focus your work throughout the drafting process.

Task: Draft Your Provisional Thesis

Download the Research-Driven Critique Essay Draft Template from the "Assignment Templates" folder. 

In this document, draft a provisional thesis for your essay, based on your thinking about the source and your discoveries in the research phase.

Summarize your evaluation of the main source in one sentence.

Task: Outline Your Essay

How to Outline a Research-Driven Critique

Build It in Sections

Think about the essay as a collection of sections or parts. 

There are the framing sections: the introduction and the conclusion.

And there is the response. The response can be made up of as many paragraphs as you need.

The Research-Driven Critique Essay has the following sections:

1. Introduction

2. Response

a. Segment 1: First Claim

b. Segment 2: Second Claim

c. Etc., however many you need

3. Conclusion 

The Purpose of an Outline

An outline provides a one-page snapshot view of the essay before you start writing. It helps to keep you on track.

Remember that you can depart from the outline as you draft and revise. The outline doesn’t lock your content down. It is more like a planned route to a destination: you know your goal and roughly how you will get there, but you are open to detours and unplanned stops along the way.

How to Write the Outline

You already have most of the key ideas that will go into your outline:

·   

  • background to your main source,
  • provisional thesis,
  • basic content and pieces of textual evidence for your response, and
  • new questions to raise in your conclusion.

You may not yet have identified the claims (key points) you want to make when critiquing your main source. The outline will help you to start that important process.

There are many ways to outline an essay. It can be a list of points you want to make. It can also be a detailed, formal outline, where main points are numbered and supporting points and evidence are lettered. You can also come up with your own system.

An outline works well when it helps you see the structural purpose of each section in the essay.

Keep these purposes in mind:

Introduction:

  • Provide background
  • Introduce your main source
  • State your thesis–your overall evaluation of the main source

Response:

  • Critique the main source
  • Support and develop the critique through reference to research sources
  • Commentary on the research sources
  • Closing sentence

Conclusion:

  • Summarize your evaluation in new words
  • Indicate possible new questions beyond the scope of your essay
  • Provide a sense of closure

Sample Outline: Critique of Nath’s “Shame Stopped Me from Learning Hindi as a Kid”

INTRODUCTION

  • Hook or Inciting Idea: What would it be like to speak a different language than your grandmother?
  • Background Context: Many people in Canada cannot speak to older relatives because they do not know their language.
  • Main Source–author, title, one-sentence summary: In “Shame Stopped Me from Learning Hindi as a Kid,” Ishani Nath explains that she did not learn Hindi as a child, but now feels that it is important for her to learn as an adult.
  • Provisional Thesis: Nath’s narrative is relevant and significant today because it shows how language and identity are connected, and how racism can affect second language learning. 

RESPONSE

  • Segment 1: First claim critiquing the main source: Nath effectively shows how language and racial identity are interconnected.
    • Textual evidence from the main source: “Canadians viewed me as Indian, Indians viewed me as ‘whitewashed’ and I was unsure of which community I fit into, or if I fit into any. As a born-and-raised Canadian with Indian heritage, I felt incapable — and, at times, ashamed — of ‘my’ language” (para. 8). 
    • Commentary: Confusion about racial identity is an issue that exists widely among second-generation immigrants. They usually speak two languages and try to meet two different cultural expectations in their daily life. Nath's recount about her experience is a reflection of the concerns from many of those who grow up with two cultures. 
    • Textual evidence from research source(s): Todd (2014): “A quarter of British Columbians with ethnic Chinese or South Asian origins say they have experienced moderate or significant amounts of those types of discrimination in B.C. as a result of their ethnicity. In total, four in five report experiencing at least a small amount of such discrimination” (para. 2). 
    • Commentary: Stereotpyes sometimes form against those who are from a different ethnic background. The language they speak, the food they eat, and the clothes they wear sometimes become the target of attack. As a result, some people decide to stay away from their heritage culture, just as Nath does.  
    • Closing sentence: By elaborating on her personal experience, Nath successfully builds a connection with the audience and send her message across.
  • Segment 2: Second claim critiquing the main source: Nath makes a strong point about how racial identity can cause barriers to second language learning.
    • Textual evidence from the main source: “My heart would race whenever the teacher gave instructions I didn’t fully understand, or when they called on me to read out loud. … [W]hen I spoke, the words always felt uncomfortably foreign (para. 6). 
    • Commentary: Learning the language of the host country is a critical step towards integration into the new culture. An encouraging environment is essential for a learner to pick up a new language fast; otherwise, the learner will feel frustrated and ashamed, as Nath feels. 
    • Textual evidence from research source(s): Cohen and Norst (1989): “The diaries also suggest that there is something fundamentally different about learning a language, compared to learning another skill or gaining other knowledge, namely, that language and self are so closely bound, if not identical, that an attack on one is an attack on the other” (p. 61). 
    • Commentary: Language is the channel for one to express their ideas and emotions. It is the foundation of building self-identity. Not being able to express oneself will certainly lead to lack of confidence, which will cause frustration, isolation, and low self-esteem. 
    • Closing sentence: The mention of the conflict that Nath went through certainly appeals to the audience's emotions, which helps Nath to drive home her message.
  • Segment 3: Third claim critiquing the main source: Nath makes an important statement when she writes that learning Hindi is a way to overcome racism.
    • Textual evidence from the main source: “So, maybe how I speak isn’t the issue, as much as is overcoming the internalized racism and shame that kept me silent (para. 39).
    • Commentary: Some people tend to forget about the significance of their cultural heritage. It is where they can gain confidence and find themselves. Only when they value their own culture can they start to gain a sense of belonging in the new culture.
    • Textual evidence from research source(s): Norton (2012): “SLA [second language acquisition] researchers who are interested in identity are interested not only in linguistic input and output in SLA, but in the relationship between the language learner and the larger social world. They question the view that learners can be defined in binary terms as motivated or unmotivated, introverted or extroverted, without considering that such affective factors are frequently socially constructed, changing across time and space, and possibly coexisting in contradictory ways within a single individual” (para. 1).
    • Commentary: Learning a new language is a complex process, where people learn at a difference pace. Understanding their motivation based on their life experience can help remove the barrier on their way to success.
    • Closing sentence: Nath's statement raises awareness about the identity issue experienced by immigrants. Meanwhile, it urges the society to be more open-minded and accepting.  

CONCLUSION

  • Restatement of the thesis in new words: Nath’s narrative is important because it shows us how some second and third generation Canadians find their true identity through language, relationships, and community.
  • New question(s): Does this narrative fit with other Canadians whose ancestors spoke a different language?
  • Concluding statement: Nath’s article shows that identity is never fixed: it changes with age, relationships, and life events. 

Task: Create Your Outline

Now you can construct the outline of your critique essay. Use the outlining method that best helps you see your essay and prepare you for the task of drafting.

INTRODUCTION

  • Hook or Inciting Idea:
  • Background Context:
  • Main Source–author, title, one-sentence summary:
  • Provisional Thesis:

RESPONSE

  • Segment 1 — First claim critiquing the main source:
    • Textual evidence from the main source:
    • Commentary:
    • Textual evidence from (one or more) research source(s):
    • Commentary:
    • Closing sentence:
  • Segment 2 — Second claim critiquing the main source:
    • Textual evidence from the main source:
    • Commentary: 
    • Textual evidence from research source(s):
    • Commentary:
    • Closing sentence: 
  • Segment 3 — Third claim critiquing the main source:
    • Textual evidence from the main source:
    • Commentary: 
    • Textual evidence from research source(s):
    • Commentary:
    • Closing sentence: 

CONCLUSION

  • Restatement of the thesis in new words:
  • Restatement of main points:
  • New question(s):
  • Concluding statement:

Task: Draft the Essay

Begin with the Body Paragraphs

After writing your outline, it is a good strategy to write the body paragraphs first. Since the thesis is a summary of the points you make in an essay, it makes sense to write and explain the points first.

We recommend beginning with the Response (which establishes your evaluation of the main source).

Response (Critique)

The Response section is the most important part of your essay. It should be organized into a series of segments, each one developing a claim that supports your thesis.

Drafting a Segment of the Response: Claims, Textual Evidence, Explanation

The basic ingredients of a segment of the Response are as follows:

  • Claim (topic sentence)
  • Textual evidence (illustration of the claim)
  • Explanation (analysis of evidence/ development of the claim)
  • Closing sentence

A number of more flexible elements may be added to this list:

  • Key transitions (i.e., from one segment to the next)
  • Contextual information about the source(s)
  • Conclusion (i.e., of the segment in question, bringing closure to the claim)

Since your goal is to use research sources to develop and support your critique of the main source, you may find a strategy like the one outlined below to be helpful.  

Put Sources in Conversation

In the kind of research essay we are writing for in this project, our fundamental activity is to put sources in conversation.

To “put sources in conversation” means to find and explain to your reader areas of similarity and difference between the sources. As the writer, you orchestrate the conversation by presenting and pointing out the areas of overlap between sources and interpreting those areas of overlap for your reader.

Introduction and Conclusion

You can develop the important introductory and concluding sections later. Write a 1-2 sentence introduction and conclusion as placeholders while you draft the body paragraphs.

Response Example

Here is an example of a response segment. 

Pay attention to the following:

  • How the topic sentence is presented. 
  • How quotations are introduced. 
  • How quotations are commented on.
  • How the paragraphs are concluded.

Nath effectively shows how language and racial identity are interconnected. As a child, her sense of self was affected by the opinions of others about how she looked and how she spoke, and she internalized that racism. She writes, “Canadians viewed me as Indian, Indians viewed me as ‘whitewashed’ and I was unsure of which community I fit into, or if I fit into any. As a born-and-raised Canadian with Indian heritage, I felt incapable — and, at times, ashamed — of ‘my’ language” (para. 8). Nath felt disconnected from the language spoken by much of her family. This shows how racism can affect people’s relationships with their family and heritage. Nath’s experience shows that Canada has racism although the government promotes respect for cultural diversity. Todd (2014) notes, “A quarter of British Columbians with ethnic Chinese or South Asian origins say they have experienced moderate or significant amounts of those types of discrimination in B.C. as a result of their ethnicity. In total, four in five report experiencing at least a small amount of such discrimination” (para. 2). Nath’s story is significant because it shows how racism affects how a person communicates with their family. Nath didn’t realize the importance of learning the language of her grandmother until the death of her mother.

Task: Write Your Complete Draft

Download the Research-Driven Critique Essay Draft Template and write a complete draft of your essay, focusing especially on the body (the response sections), and adding at least a brief introduction and conclusion of a few sentences each. (You will have the opportunity in the next unit to develop these framing pieces of introduction and conclusion.)

To be considered complete, this draft should be in the range of about 1000 words, should include a full response, and should make use of the main source and at least three research sources. 

Read your draft over to ensure that there are no obvious errors that will make comprehension more difficult.  

When you are done, send your rough draft to the Research-Driven Critique Essay Draft drop box for feedback. 

Please note that submitting the essay draft is mandatory. Failing to submit the draft will result in loss of 20% of the overall grade of the Research-Driven Critique Essay. 

Looking Ahead

In Unit 10, you will develop the introduction and conclusion, revise and edit your essay draft. 

In Unit 11, you will finalize your essay.

Centennial College. (n.d.). Unit 9: Unit 9 Review and Looking Ahead. In COMM170. Winter 2020 [Online course]. 

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